Green Tomato and Capsicum “Chut-ckle”

A good few months ago when I harvested all my green tomatoes from the garden before winter set in, I also scored lots of really cheap capsicum. I roasted them in Big Bill my clay oven one day, and together with my “I wonder where this is going” touch, it became a wonderful frequent addition to my lunch over the winter:

It’s not really a chutney for it is not thick, but it is not really a pickle either. There is a lot of liquid which I love drizzling over my salads like a dressing. I didn’t write down the exact amount of each ingredient as I created it, so this recipe I’m sharing is really more a rough guide, or perhaps an inspiration. Nevertheless, I really enjoyed it, and definitely will recreate it next year, so here it is.

Take:

  • about a 2 litre bowl of green tomatoes
  • also roughly 2 litre of capsicums
  • 4-5 large onions
  • peeled garlic cloves from 2 bulbs
  • a good handful of fresh thyme, roughly chopped
  • ~4 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 500ml balsamic vinegar
  • ~1 cup brown sugar
  • ~1 teaspoon salt

What I did:

Roasted vegetables

  1. Roughly chop tomatoes, capsicums and onions into large chunks and put into a roasting dish with garlics and thyme.
  2. Drizzle over the olive oil and roast (160-180C is good) until the onions are just tender.
  3. Tip the roasted vegetables into a large pot and add vinegar, sugar and salt.
  4. Add enough water to just cover all the vegetables.
  5. Bring to boil and simmer for 30 minutes.
  6. Taste the sauce and if required, add more water/sugar/vinegar/salt to your taste.
  7. Keep the chut-ckle barely simmering, use another large deep pot and boil your jars together with the lids for 10 minutes.
  8. Very carefully, use tongs to get the jars and lids out of the boiling water. I always wear silicon rubber gloves while doing this. Pour the water back in the pot so you have empty jars. Shake the lids to get rid of dripping water but don’t worry about getting the jars or the lids absolutely dry.
  9. Ladle the simmering chut-ckle into the a jar as full as you can without over flowing. Try to get the jar full to within 0.5cm to the rim.
  10. Screw on the top and invert the jar so it’s standing on the lid. It’s a really good idea to be wearing mitts while handling the jars.
  11. Repeat the process until you’ve jarred up all the chut-ckle. Your last jar is probably not full, but don’t worry about this – you will start eating this jar right away.
  12. Turn the jars back upright to let them cool. As they cool, you will hear the metal lids go “pop”, which indicates good seals (and always sound very rewarding :)).
  13. Well sealed jars should keep for months and months! The first time you open one, the lid should pop. If a lid is not concave and did not pop when first opened, you may need to throw that jar away. Once opened, store the jar in the fridge and it should keep for up to a month from the time it’s opened.

It’s good to let the full jars mature for at least a month. Green tomatoes can taste a little stringent, and because this chut-ckle is not very sweet, it really does benefit from maturing. The taste definitely develop over time if you can practice a little patience.

What I really like about this chut-ckle is the vegetables are chunky, and the sauce is wonderful to drizzle over salads as a dressing. The sauce taste a little similar to this balsamic dressing I’m also addicted to, which you may also like to try. Enjoy!

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6 thoughts on “Green Tomato and Capsicum “Chut-ckle”

  1. Pingback: Tomato and Capsicum Chutney | Imported Kiwi

  2. Pingback: Playful Bodies Need Good Fuel | Imported Kiwi

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